German Federal Agency for Nature Conservation (BfN)

Mainmenu



Threat criteria and categories in the German Red List of Threatened Habitats


Inland sand dunes in a former military training area
Inland sand dunes in a former military training area

The revised criteria system for the third edition of the German Red List of Threatened Habitat Types is based on the following requirements:

The new criteria and categories are required to be largely based on the previous version so as to permit comparison with past Red Lists (Riecken et al. 1994 and 2006) while incorporating as many aspects as possible out of the conceptual framework for the IUCN Red List of Ecosystems (Keith et al. 2013) and the approaches currently used for the Red Lists of species (Ludwig et al. 2009).



The revised criteria system for the third edition of the German Red List of Threatened Habitat Types is based on the following requirements:

The new criteria and categories are required to be largely based on the previous version so as to permit comparison with past Red Lists (Riecken et al. 1994 and 2006) while incorporating as many aspects as possible out of the conceptual framework for the IUCN Red List of Ecosystems (Keith et al. 2013) and the approaches currently used for the Red Lists of species (Ludwig et al. 2009).

The national long-term threat (nG) is determined by first assessing the area loss (AL) as a measure of direct destruction based on an analysis of trends over the past 50 to 150 years and then additionally assessing the quality loss (QUL) as a measure of gradual degradation over the same reference period. These two criteria are aggregated to determine a regional threat value (rTH) for each of Germany’s eight physiographic regions. The regional threat ranking is equal to whichever is the higher of the area loss and quality loss ranking. The average of the regional threat rankings yields the national long-term threat (nTH).

In a further step, the national long-term threat (nTH) is combined with the current trend (T) and rarity (R) in an assessment matrix into a single parameter, the Red List status (RLD) (following Ludwig et al. 2009).

Determination of the Red List status (RLD), from Finck et al. 2017 (modified)
Determination of the Red List status (RLD), from Finck et al. 2017 (modified)

The current trend in this methodology assesses the threat status of a habitat type based on the trend over approximately the last 10 years and represents a prognosis for the near future (up to a maximum of another 10 years). Consideration must, however, be given to the fact that short-term changes in extraneous conditions (e. g. changes in EU farming subsidies), and longer-term events whose impacts are not yet sufficiently known (such as climate change) can lead to a more negative outcome than the prognosis indicates. Conversely, it is also possible that in certain areas, nature conservation efforts and legal requirements (such as the Habitats Directive and the Water Framework Directive) will result in a more positive trend.

In the 2006 German Red List of Threatened Habitat Types (Riecken et al. 2006), the Red List ranking for Germany corresponded to the national long-term threat, the current trend was provided by way of additional information and rarity was indicated as Red List category R.


To top

Criteria and categories

Area Loss (AL)

0 Collapsed
1 Critically Endangered
2 Endangered
3 Vulnerable
V Near threatened
* Least concern (currently not threatened)
? Data deficient/ranking not possible


Quality Loss (QUL)

0 Collapsed
1 Critically Endangered
2 Endangered
3 Vulnerable
* Least concern (currently not threatened)
? Data deficient/ranking not possible


Regional threat (rTH) and national long-term threat (nTH)

 0 Collapsed
 1 Critically endangered
 2 Endangered
 3 Vulnerable
 V Near threatened
 * Least concern (currently not threatened)
 # Threat ranking not meaningful
 ? Data deficient/ranking not possible


Current trend (T)

- decreasing
+/- stable
+ increasing
? insuficient data
# threat ranking not meaningful


Rarity (R)

Habitat types are classified into the categories "Very Rare" and "Not Very Rare".


Red List Status (RLD)

  • 0 Collapsed
  • 1! Critically endangered (acute)
  • 1 Critically endagered
  • 1-2 Endangered to critically endangered
  • 2 Endangered
  • 2-3 Vulnerable to endangered
  • 3 Vulnerable
  • 3-V Near threatened (acute)
  • V Near threatened
  • * No current risk of loss (least concern)
  • ? Data deficient/ranking not possible
  • # Threat ranking not meaningful

The threat status and current trend projection are supplemented with an assessment of the regenerability (RE) of each habitat type. Regenerability is an important facet of habitat ‘sensitivity’ and provides a way of prioritising conservation effort between habitats of the same threat ranking. This information is also useful for assessing the potential for mitigating impacts of human activities on the natural environment.

Regenerability (RE)

N      None 
K      Minimal (> 150 years) 
S      Very limited (ca. 15-150 years) 
B      Limited (bis 15 years) 
X      Classification not meaningful


To top

Last Change: 31/05/2017

 Print