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The Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) and the Green Belt


The Korean Demilitarised Zone (DMZ) has divided Korea for over 60 years. The zone is about 250 km long and 4 km across. To the south, the DMZ adjoins a limited-access civil control zone 6-10 km wide.

The Korean Demilitarised Zone (DMZ) and the Green Belt

The eastern end of the Korean Demilitarised Zone; photo: U. Riecken
Photo of the eastern end of the Korean Demilitarised Zone; photo: U. Riecken

The Korean Demilitarised Zone (DMZ) has divided Korea for 60 years. The zone is 250 km long and 4 km across. To the south, the DMZ adjoins a limited-access civil control zone 6-10 km wide. Like the European Green Belt, the DMZ and the civil control zone form a strip of land where nature has been able to develop largely undisturbed, creating a retreat for numerous endangered species. South Korea has worked for many years with international support to secure this valuable land for nature conservation. Again as in the European Green Belt, these efforts aim to incorporate the economic needs of the regional population combined with the development of sustainable tourism.


Photo of the signing ceremony for the Joint Declaration of Intent on cooperation with Gyeonggi Province, Republic of Korea, in Berlin; photo: BfN

In February 2012, BfN signed an agreement with Gyeonggi Province, South Korea, for cooperation on the DMZ and the Green Belt. A workshop held in 2012 provided an opportunity for initial exchange and to discuss the onward working relationship.


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