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Specially Protected Habitats under Section 30 of the Federal Nature Conservation Act

Section 30 of the Federal Nature Conservation Act provides protection for a range of habitat types to safeguard them from significant and lasting impacts. The quality of the protection provided should correspond to nature conservation areas. The following habitat types are protected by law:


Natural areas of flowing inland waterbodies. Photo: U. Riecken
Natürliche Bereiche fließender Binnengewässer, Obere Isar, Foto: U. Riecken

Natural or semi-natural areas of flowing and standing inland water bodies, including their banks and the relevant natural or semi-natural vegetation associated with the banks, together with their natural or semi-natural sedimentation areas, backwaters and areas that are regularly flooded;


Sedge and rush-rich wet meadows. Photo: U. Riecken
Sedge and rush-rich wet meadows. Photo: U. Riecken

Bogs, swamps, large sedge swamps, reeds and large-sedge reed beds, wetland meadows rich in sedges and rushes, springs and inland salt deposits.


Open inland dunes. Photo: U. Riecken
Open inland dunes. Photo: U. Riecken

Open inland dunes, open natural boulder, rubble and scree slopes, clay and loess walls, dwarf-shrub, broom and juniper heaths, matgrass communities, dry meadows, heavy metal grassland, forests and bushes in xerothermic locations.


Fen woodland. Photo: U. Riecken
Fen woodland, Nord Pomerania, Photo: U. Riecken

Fen and bog woodlands, riparian forests, forests of ravines, slopes and screes, subalpine larch forests and riparian larch forests.


Open rock formations. Photo: U. Riecken
Open rock formations, Karwendel, Photo: U. Riecken

Open rock formations, alpine grassland, snowbeds and elfin woodland.


Steep cliffs. Photo: U. Riecken
Steep cliffs, Zicker (Rügen), Photo: U. Riecken

Rocky shores and cliffs, coastal dunes and beach ridges, coastal lakes, bodden with terrestrialisation zones, salt meadows and tidal shallows in the coastal region, seagrass meadows and other marine macrophyte populations, reefs, sublittoral sandbanks and silty bottoms with boring bottom megafauna and species-rich gravel, coarse-sand and shell layers in marine and coastal regions.

Some of these habitat types were first added to the catalogue of legally protected habitats with the revision of the Federal Nature Conservation Act in 2009. They are all endangered habitat types.

Endangered habitat types added to the list of specially protected habitats following the revision to the Federal Nature Conservation Act, with threat ranking (2: Endangered; 3: Vulnerable)
CodeHabitat typRLD
01.02.07Sandbank in North Sea offshore waters (habitat complex3
01.02.08.01Fine substrate habitat in North Sea offshore waters, with mud substrate (dominated by silt and clay)2
01.02.08.02Fine substrate habitat in North Sea offshore waters, with mixed substrate (mud to fine sand)3
03.02.07Sandbank in North Sea coastal waters, with or without macrophytes3
37.01nutrient-poor large sedge swamp2
37.02nutrient-rich large sedge swamp3
70.03Subalpine larch-Swiss stone pine woodland3
70.04Subalpine larch woodland3

(After Riecken et al. 2006)

Analysis of the current Red List of Endangered Habitat Types (Riecken et al. 2006) shows that only some three-quarters of all threatened habitat types (including categories 3, V and ?) are protected by law. The chart below shows the numbers by category.


Numbers of endangered habitat types in the Red List of Endangered Habitats (categories 3, V and ?; excluding ‘technical’ habitat types) that are also habitat types protected by law (under section 30 of the Federal Nature Conservation Act)

0 Destroyed, 1 Critically endangered, 2 Endangered, 3 Vulnerable, R Rare (geographically restricted), V Near threatened, ? Data deficient (conservation status after Riecken et al. 2006)

Kontact

For further questions:

Uwe Riecken
Peter Finck

FG II 2.1

Last Change: 18/02/2015

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